Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

Journal of Christian Nursing Wins 4 Awards

May 5, 2017

552017asphegoldspread

Good news just arrived for JCN! For the third year in a row, Journal of Christian Nursing made a very impressive showing in the annual awards competition for the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASPHE).

“I am most excited that our editorial content won an award for Best Feature Article for the second year in a row!” said Kathy Schoonover-Shoffner, JCN Editor-in-Chief and NCF Director.

“God brings good ideas in manuscripts and gives us the wisdom to edit and prepare articles to present solid biblical, clinical, and professional content.”

“Furthermore, we have an amazing graphic designer at Lippincott,” Kathy adds. “Our designer says she loves working with us because we give her great ideas and then let her be creative.”

JCN won four awards – three for design and one for content:

  • Gold Award in the Best Opening Page/Spread: Photo Category
    When Sorrow Never Stops: Chronic Sorrow After the Death of a Child (January/March 2016)
  • Silver Award in the Best Cover: Illustration Category
    Teen Depression and Suicide: A Silent Crisis (April/June 2016)
  • Bronze Award in the Best Feature Article Category
    Teen Depression and Suicide: A Silent Crisis (April/June 2016)
  • Bronze Award in the Best Cover: Photo Category
    Trauma-Informed Care: Helping Patients with a Painful Past (October/December 2016)

In announcing the awards, Kathy received this word of praise from Julie Rempfer, Associate Publisher at Wolters Kluwer: “These awards are a testament to your creative and editorial genius as well as all the hard work that goes into the journal.”

Congratulations also flowed from InterVarsity coworkers who highly value the ministry partnership of NCF among nurses, students and nurse educators. “These awards represent public affirmation of the excellence of NCF and its commitment to the healthcare profession and to culture-making for the kingdom of God,” said Jason Thomas, Chief Campus Ministry Officer for InterVarsity.

We strive to honor God in all we do,” said Kathy, “and these awards are an affirmation among our peers in healthcare publishing. We are tremendously honored by this recognition.”


Become a member of NCF and regularly receive Journal of Christian Nursing as one of your member benefits, or subscribe to JCN. Take advantage of the May Membership Special and join NCF at a discounted rate using Promo Code nnw2017. Offer expires May 31, 2017.

 

Join NCF with 25% Discount

May 1, 2017

4memspecialNational Nurses Week starts May 6, but you can celebrate your special role as a Christian nurse all year long! Become an annual member of Nurses Christian Fellowship in May and get a 25% discount on membership fees. As an NCF member, you’ll receive the Journal of Christian Nursing throughout the year, along with other benefits.

When you join NCF, you’ll be part of a large network of Christian nurses who are devoted to serving God in healthcare. Member fees are modest compared to other professional organizations.

Take advantage of the MAY Membership Discount and join NCF with a special 25% discount offer during May 1-31, 2017. At checkout, use discount code nnw2017. Current members are also encouraged to renew at a discounted rate.

Member benefits include the Journal of Christian Nursing which offers a vital blend of clinical excellence with a Christian perspective on healthcare. Members also receive significant discounts on CE credits through JCN and NursingCenter.com.

NCF membership demonstrates a commitment to both your faith and your profession. Find out more about NCF membership and be a part of our mission to engage nursing students and nurses with the healing love of Jesus.

The Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit

April 21, 2017

4212017nnw17National Nurses Week is around the corner and this year’s theme, “Nursing: The Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit,” provides natural opportunities for Christian nurses to invite others to consider God’s view of holistic health.

Here are some tips and resources for you to take advantage of this special week and encourage nurse friends and colleagues in their faith and nursing practice.

Nurses Week Bible Discussion

We’ve created a special Bible study on this year’s theme to download and use for a group study or personal devotional. Invite your nurse friends and coworkers to explore how Jesus defined health in body, mind and spirit. We offer this Scriptural meditation for your reflection on what it means to love God, love others, and love yourself.

NCF Resources

See all the special resources, prayer guides, and promotional materials for ideas on how to maximize Nurses Week and reach out to others.

Events

Some NCF nurse groups are hosting gatherings in their area. Check out these NCF events and pray that people will be drawn to the living God and healthier lives through these special gatherings.

Your Thoughts on the Theme?

We’d love to hear your thoughts on how you find balance in mind, body and spirit. This is a significant topic that is an ongoing challenge for many of us, and you can email NCF with your comments or insights on this important topic in nursing.

Thank you, ANA, for choosing a theme that is dear to the heart of God!

Spiritual Care Resources

February 24, 2017

2132017spiritualcarecardHow do you care for the spiritual needs of your patients? Knowing how to assess a person’s spiritual health and provide spiritual care interventions is part of caring for the whole person.

Care of the spirit, a hallmark of good nursing, is a high priority for Christian nurses. What is known about spirituality and spiritual care? How do we go about offering spiritual care?

Begin with a careful assessment using these questions:

  • Do you consider yourself to be spiritual or religious?
  • What importance does faith have in your life?
  • Are you part of a faith community?
  • What spiritual activities are important to you?
  • What sustains you and keep you going?
  • How would you like me to support your faith or address your needs?

Always remember to focus on the patient’s needs, not your own. Respect the patient’s views and support the person’s decision. Ask God to guide your care of patients and be attentive to his presence.

Find more resources on spiritual care, including a handy pocket-size spiritual care card that includes basic assessment questions and spiritual care interventions.

See the special JCN Collection of articles on Spirituality and Spiritual Care. These are free for NCF members and JCN subscribers or available for purchase. Learn from the Journal of Christian Nursing what researchers, patients, and other experts say makes for good spiritual care.

What NCF loves

February 14, 2017

ncf_logo_square_complete_transparentTake a close look at our NCF logo and you’ll see what we care about most. See the four hearts? They symbolize :

  • Love for God
  • Love for God’s Word
  • Love for God’s people of every ethnicity and culture
  • Love for God’s purposes in the world

These four loves are covered by the cross of Christ. The tips of the cross point outward, expressing the outward mission of NCF to reflect the love of God in our lives as a response to his love, grace and truth. We humbly respond to God’s invitation to be a part of his healing work among the nations.

Every NCF member receives a logo pin that shows support for our common purpose of representing Christ’s love in our nursing practice. If you are not member, join the NCF professional network of Christian nurses that supports you—and your faith!

Become a member of NCF today. Let’s share the love!

Trauma-Informed Care

September 27, 2016

9272016traumaAs nurses, how can we help patients with a painful past? The experience of trauma in people’s lives has a direct impact on their health behaviors, particularly an increased risk of mortality from chronic illness.

Trauma-informed care (TIC) is an approach to engage people with a history of life trauma that recognizes trauma symptoms and acknowledges the role trauma has played in their lives.

“For nurses, this translates into understanding the why behind health behaviors of our patients, withholding judgment for negative health behaviors, and helping patients heal physically, psychologically and spiritually,” writes Cathy Koetting, DNP, APRN, in her article, “Trauma-Informed Care” in Journal of Christian Nursing, Oct-Dec 2016.

Trauma-informed care seeks to change the illness paradigm from one that asks, “What’s wrong with you?” to “What has happened to you?” Studies indicate that health risk behavior and disease in childhood can be related to the span of exposure of childhood emotional, physical or sexual abuse, and household dysfunction.

In her article, Koetting outlines four essential approaches and six specific principles that define TIC, including safety, trustworthiness, peer support, and empowerment—especially through spirituality.

These concepts are evident in John 4 where Jesus provides a model of trauma-informed care for the woman he encountered at the well in Samaria:

  • Jesus realized the impact of trauma on this woman’s life and reached out to her, treating her graciously.
  • He recognized her trauma and gently responded, with respect and insight.
  • Instead of judging and retraumatizing her, Jesus offered a relationship with God.
  • Jesus gave the woman a voice as he took into account current cultural, historical, and gender issues.
  • He created a safe space to interact and proved himself trustworthy.
  • He empowered the Samaritan woman by being transparent and giving her knowledge that he was the Messiah.

“Nurses need to be aware of how they can integrate these ideas into practice,” Koetting urges. “The goal is to guide patients from a state of trauma to one of healing, to help patients alter their family and community environments so it is less traumatic.”

Increasing awareness of the need for TIC and conversations with colleagues can be the start of a cultural shift in the workplace. Healthcare organizations are often stressful and chaotic places in which to work, but TIC can transform the care-giving experience for nurses by remodeling their workplace culture to one that promotes holistic recovery for all.

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This JCN article offers 2.5 CE contact hours. Become a member of Nurses Christian Fellowship and receive JCN regularly as a member benefit, as well as discounts on all CE.

A Visitation Program for Seniors

September 12, 2016

9122016waitingMaking homebound visits is an important part of the ministry of the church, especially for older seniors who are vulnerable to isolation and poor quality of life. Yet too often they are neglected and left longing for visitors.

Julia Quiring Emblen, PhD, RN, was troubled by the lonely seniors she visited in her church. “Some told me the church community had all but forgotten about them,” she writes in her article, “A Compassionate Visitation Program for Church Homebound Elders” from Journal of Christian Nursing.

Many of the elders Julia visited had been leaders of the church for years. “Recalling how much service these former spiritual pillars had given to the congregation, I felt sad that now, when they were in need, they received so little,” Julia said. She was determined to improve the care of the homebound elders in her church.

Realizing that older seniors need support, a Compassionate Visitation Program was initiated. Most of the volunteers were in their 60s or 70s. It soon became apparent that more emphasis was needed on making the visit experience enjoyable for recipients and satisfying to the visitors.

The program developed general focus points using the acrostic HOMEBOUND to help visitors remember to incorporate Humor, Observation, Music, Encouragement, etc. Parts of the program include an awareness of Nutritional issues and even the Death of the visitee.

Active listening is a nursing skill that can be taught to visitors who can listen to a person’s stories about the past and concerns about the future. Allowing them to share their pain validates their experience and helps decrease the loneliness of chronic pain. Visitors can learn to be present, listen to the visitees, help them process their feelings, and explore healthy responses.

Over time, guidelines and a structure for the Compassionate Visitation Program were developed with a Visit Facilitator coordinating the program for the church.

A friendly visit can encourage and lighten some of the lonely hours for those who have little to do during their long days. “It takes time and planning on the part of the visitor,” Julia concludes, “but the time pays off when the visitor is leaving and hears, ‘Come back soon! I really enjoy our time together.’”

Are there homebound seniors in your church who are longing for visitors? Read the full JCN article for more tips and program ideas.

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This JCN article offers 2.5 CE contact hours. Become a member of Nurses Christian Fellowship and receive JCN regularly as a member benefit, as well as discounts on all CE.

Free JCN

August 16, 2016

33.3Check out the current issue of Journal of Christian Nursing which is this month’s FREE featured journal at NursingCenter.com. This offer is good until September 1, 2016.

JCN is the flagship professional publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship. Each issue offers continuing education activities, special features, recurring departments, and more. Published in print and online, articles and departments address everyday concerns of students and nurses in practice and education.

JCN strives to help nurses view nursing through the eyes of faith; its mission is to help nurses and nursing students practice nursing from a biblically-based, Christian perspective. The current issue includes feature articles on workplace toxicity, faith community nursing, missions, Ebola, spiritual care, and public health nursing. Don’t miss out on these great articles!

Keep getting JCN and other great discounts and benefits when you become a member of Nurses Christian Fellowship.

Invest in your nursing practice through NCF membership and JCN!

Being Transformed?

February 1, 2016

212016jcnandbibleWhat changes are you hoping for this year? What would you like to see transformed in your life?

The apostle Paul has a lot to say about how God transforms us in Romans 12:2.

“Paul encouraged the Christians in Rome not to fashion their lives after the customs of the world about them, but to have God-focused thinking,” writes Kathy Schoonover-Shoffner in her recent editorial in Journal of Christian Nursing.

“It’s the same for us today. To be transformed, we must renew our minds by focusing our attention on God and feeding our thoughts with God’s Word, as found in the Bible,” Kathy writes.

This is why Nurses Christian Fellowship uses the tagline “Be Transformed, Transform Nursing” to invite nurses, students, and educators on a journey of renewal and transformation.

“NCF helps nurses think about God and make daily, real-world connections between God’s Word and nursing,” writes Kathy. “As we follow Jesus in nursing, we are changed from the inside out. We help each other fix our attention on God and his designs for our individual and collective nursing practice.”

Kathy invites you to start your 2016 journey to be God’s transformed nurse by becoming a member of NCF. Join NCF and be a part of what God doing to change the nursing world.

Kathy summarizes, “Together, we can transform nursing students and schools of nursing. Together, we can be transformed nurses who transform our work places. Together, we can transform nursing.”

Find out more about membership and benefits of the NCF professional network.

How to Prepare for Nurses Week

April 13, 2015

National Nurses Week 2015Providing high-quality care and ethical practice is a primary concern of all nurses. As Christians, we have natural opportunities during National Nurses Week to focus on this theme from a biblical perspective and to celebrate nursing with our peers and coworkers.

I encourage you to connect, pray and engage with other nurses this week in the love of Jesus. Invite nurses to download (in PDF) and share the Bible discussion on Philippians 4:8-9, we have prepared on this year’s theme.

We have also prepared suggestions for planning an event and getting the word out, plus program ideas and sample schedules. Use the Nurses Week prayer guide when you gather together and pray for the nurses in your work setting. Invite your church to pray for the needs of nurses in their congregation with a church bulletin insert you can download and print.

Here is one prayer we can all keep in mind for Nurses Week:

“We pray that nurses and nursing students will experience God’s encouragement as they face opportunities and challenges in caring for others in the name of Jesus Christ.

This special week prompts us to remember nurses who represent Jesus to patients, families, and co-workers.

May God open doors for you to celebrate nursing and glorify God during Nurses Week this year!

–Jane Hall, NCF National Director