Archive for the ‘Bible Study’ Category

Florence Nightingale’s Very Ordinary Ability

May 12, 2017

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Florence Nightingale said, “If I could give you information of my life, it would be to show how a woman of very ordinary ability has been led by God in strange and unaccustomed paths to do in His service what He has done in her. And if I could tell you all, you would see how God has done all, and I nothing.”

Nothing? That’s a humble assessment from the founder of modern nursing. Florence Nightingale transformed nursing practice through her faithful devotion to God who made it all possible. This leads every nurse to ask, how can I use my “very ordinary ability” in the path God has put before me?

As we celebrate our founder’s birthday on May 12 through National Nurses Week, may you find ways to follow her example and take advantage of the opportunities God has given you to express his love and grace to your peers and co-workers.

Who knows what God can do with your “very ordinary ability?”

Join NCF before May 31, 2017 with a 25% discount. Use promo code nnw2017 at checkout.

The Challenge of Loving Ourselves

April 27, 2017

4272017relaxNurses have a tough balancing act. In a demanding profession, we struggle to care for ourselves as we care for others.

The American Nurses Association recognizes this challenge with this year’s theme for National Nurses Week, “Nursing, The Balance of Mind, Body, and Spirit.”

For Christian nurses, this theme is deeply imbedded in Scripture. Nurses Christian Fellowship has created a Bible study that addresses the balance of mind, body and spirit from a biblical viewpoint. We encourage you to reflect on this passage in your devotional time this week. Consider inviting your nursing friends and coworkers to a Bible discussion on balance in nursing using the questions provided.

In Luke 10:25-28, we read a story about a man who comes to Jesus with a question about eternal life. Jesus endorsed the man’s biblical understanding that we are to love God, love others, and love ourselves. But Jesus responds with an expanded meaning of what it means to have a healthy life. “Do this, and you will live.”

The man in the story didn’t like Jesus’ answer. We don’t, either. And here is the problem. We know what we should do to be healthy, but it’s not that easy. We all have behaviors, habits and temptations that contribute to an unhealthy life.

Sometimes it’s easier to love God and love others than it is to love ourselves. If we truly loved ourselves in body, mind and spirit, how might this contribute to better health? How can we find a better balance in our lives and take care of ourselves so that we have more to give God and others?

We’d love to hear your thoughts about this challenging topic. Please email NCF with your comments or insights.

ANA has provided a powerful kernel of truth that is amplified by God’s Word to us. NCF nurses, students and educators have an open door to explore what this means for themselves and their nurse friends and coworkers during Nurses Week.

The Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit

April 21, 2017

4212017nnw17National Nurses Week is around the corner and this year’s theme, “Nursing: The Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit,” provides natural opportunities for Christian nurses to invite others to consider God’s view of holistic health.

Here are some tips and resources for you to take advantage of this special week and encourage nurse friends and colleagues in their faith and nursing practice.

Nurses Week Bible Discussion

We’ve created a special Bible study on this year’s theme to download and use for a group study or personal devotional. Invite your nurse friends and coworkers to explore how Jesus defined health in body, mind and spirit. We offer this Scriptural meditation for your reflection on what it means to love God, love others, and love yourself.

NCF Resources

See all the special resources, prayer guides, and promotional materials for ideas on how to maximize Nurses Week and reach out to others.

Events

Some NCF nurse groups are hosting gatherings in their area. Check out these NCF events and pray that people will be drawn to the living God and healthier lives through these special gatherings.

Your Thoughts on the Theme?

We’d love to hear your thoughts on how you find balance in mind, body and spirit. This is a significant topic that is an ongoing challenge for many of us, and you can email NCF with your comments or insights on this important topic in nursing.

Thank you, ANA, for choosing a theme that is dear to the heart of God!

Encouraging Nursing Students

March 24, 2017

3242017encourageWhen new students join the NCF chapter on their campus, they often ask, “What is NCF?” There are three words that capture the mission and vision of NCF on campus. NCF is a place where students and faculty can be encouraged, equipped, and empowered.

In this first blog post, we will focus on what it means that NCF is a place where students and faculty can be encouraged. Stressed-out students need over-all encouragement. But NCF also has the unique mission of encouraging spiritual growth. To accomplish this mission, many NCF chapters make Bible study the centerpiece of their meetings.

But NCF is not your ordinary Bible study. NCF is a community that encourages spiritual growth in the context of nursing school. This is why NCF publishes a variety of Bible studies that look at how our faith impacts nursing. In our newest series, Trusting God in Nursing School, we invite students to consider what the Bible says about anxiety, academic competition, and suffering. Ultimately, we want students and faculty to increasingly place their faith and hope in Jesus Christ.

Join us in praying for our 100+ NCF student chapters as they seek to encourage spiritual growth in the context of nursing school!

–Tim Lin, Student Ministries Director

Climate Change in Nursing School

November 8, 2016

1182016kumed“What’s the spiritual climate of your nursing school?” I asked three nursing students over lunch. Mackenzie, Sean, and Ben responded that there was no place in the nursing school where they could talk about their faith. So together we agreed—let’s start an NCF chapter at KU Med!

These are my favorite conversations: fanning into flames the dreams that God has already given to nursing students and faculty. I love hearing how God has given them a vision to bring Christ into their nursing school and change its spiritual climate.

In my new role as NCF Student Ministries Director, our staff team is developing additional resources and training opportunities to equip and encourage our student leaders to intentionally follow Jesus on their campus and invite others into their NCF community.

One exciting innovation this fall is that we are offering webinars for all student leaders and faculty advisors. I am partnering with Bonnie Hann, NCF Campus Liaison, for virtual training on Leading Effective Bible Studies (11/14/16) and on Spiritual Care (12/5/16) to understand and assess spiritual needs and appropriate interventions. Bonnie and I love the face-to-face interaction with these eager student leaders.

logo220x220We’re also excited about offering student leaders the Discipleship Cycle Framework, a simple tool to help NCF chapters consistently apply God’s Word in their lives.

The Discipleship Cycle is incorporated into a new series of NCF Bible studies, Trusting God in Nursing School. Specific Scripture passages will help students deal with the stress and anxiety that come with a rigorous academic program and clinical demands. They will grow in Christ and have opportunities to share what they’re learning with others in their nursing school.

The end of the semester is approaching but we are rejoicing in how God is actively seeking and saving students in nursing programs across the country.

Timothy Lin, NCF Student Ministries Director

Jesus as Our Role Model

August 1, 2016

812016womanatwellAs Christian nurses, we have Jesus as our source of strength and role model. I love how Jesus sees all of us from the perspective of God’s Kingdom. This perspective teaches us how to see and think about people and thus how to care for patients and their families and collaborate with our co-workers.

We read about Jesus who met the Samaritan woman at the well in John 4:1-26. Jesus sees the woman and knows who she is; still he decides to spend time with her. As we read the text, we can sense the gentleness and the intensity of their conversation, and how Jesus touches her deeply in her spirit. She becomes convinced that she has met the long-awaited Messiah. This makes her a witness for Christ.

In Luke 19:1-10 we read about Zacchaeus up in a tree. Again, Jesus acts beyond the rules and norms and sees to the heart and longing of this man. He greets Zacchaeus in the tree and invites himself to dinner with him. This transforms Zacchaeus. Jesus acknowledges this sinner to be a saved son of Abraham, and Zacchaeus’ transformed heart shows itself in action.

One of the stories I like the best from the gospels is about the blind beggar outside of Jericho (Luke 18:35-43). Try to imagine the crowd of people and all the noise. In the middle of this, Jesus recognizes the one who needs him. He stops and asks this wonderful question: “What do you want me to do for you?”

Have you noticed that Jesus often asks questions when he teaches and meets with people? He is interested in understanding people—who they are and how they think. Having Jesus as our role model challenges us to consider these questions: Am I interested in understanding people? Do I take the time to stop and listen to people in my path who may need me?

Will you join me in following Jesus’ example and practice this question: “What do you want me to do for you?” I’m interested in hearing about your experiences from using this question. Please share your comments below.

Tove Giske
President, Nurses Christian Fellowship International (NCFI)

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Photo credit by Angelica Kauffman – Upload 1: repro from art bookUpload 2: Own Work, photo taken by Cybershot800i., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8988425

Peter’s Wisdom

March 21, 2016

3212016roosterDuring the Last Supper, Jesus warned Peter that he would be sifted by Satan and deny him three times (Luke 22:31-34). As the evening continues, Peter repeatedly denies Christ. His denial is not quiet, but vocal and wholehearted. After the third denial, Peter hears the rooster crow—and his heart breaks.

Our hearts break with Peter, for his personal sin becomes part of our redemption story.

After reading Peter’s experience, we are not surprised when he uses the metaphor “devour” to describe Satan’s tactic for Christians. I am sure Peter felt sifted, distraught and close to being devoured. Thankfully, in the same passage, Peter reaches out to all of us with wisdom:

“Be sober and alert. Your enemy the devil, like a roaring lion, is on the prowl looking for someone to devour. Resist him, strong in your faith, because you know that your brothers and sisters throughout the world are enduring the same kinds of suffering” (1 Peter 5:8-9).

Peter encourages us to stay “sober and alert” which means we can’t get complacent about Satan and assume he’s on vacation. We need to “resist him” by being strong in our faith, not a faith filled with words and strength, but a faith dependent upon Christ (1 John 5:5). The true victor in the war with Satan is Jesus, thus our prayers are to him.

Peter depended upon the prayers of Jesus who told him, “I have prayed for you, Simon (Peter), that your faith may not fail.” In the same way He tells us, “I have prayed for you, _[insert name]  , that your faith may not fail” (Luke 22:32).

I thank God for Peter’s wise words to us.

NCFI CARES

Carrie Dameron, MSN, RNBC, who is a regular contributor for Nurses Christian Fellowship International and Journal of Christian Nursing. She provides resources for Christian nursing on her blog http://blog.carriedameron.com/.

God at Work at SDSU

March 8, 2016

382016sdsuKirsten Sakata was nervous about starting a Bible discussion in her nursing school, but got excited when five people came to the first meeting a few weeks ago. The group discussed “Stress in the Life of a Nursing Student” from the What’s Vital? NCF Bible study series.

“God exceeded my expectations! We laughed, shed tears, and had deep conversations. The Lord met every one of us tonight,” Kirsten said. “I can’t wait to have the next meeting.”

Afterward, one of the girls texted Kirsten: “The study went really well. God was definitely in it.” Kirsten sees this as confirmation that God is moving in the nursing department.

“I see how many of my classmates are yearning for something more than just being “a nurse.” They want something more, and I believe this is a personal relationship with Jesus,” Kirsten said.

“I am thankful for what God is doing—and will be doing—on our campus!”

Why We Should Pray: part 2

October 8, 2015

David's PrayerAs Christians, we all know that prayer is important. Sometimes we pray; sometimes we don’t. Sometimes we pray fervently; sometimes we pray half-heartedly. We all need help.

This series on prayer begins with a core question, Why Should We Pray?

Short answer: God expects us to pray, to offer him praises and to let him know our needs. The Bible includes countless examples of God’s people offering prayers of all kinds.

One of my favorite examples is King David’s prayer of praise when the people of Israel brought all the supplies needed to build the temple in Jerusalem. David had a long history of talking to God, and he knew that God expected him to offer praise, confession, and to ask for what he needed.

God’s word commands us to pray. And if we don’t pray we are neglecting God’s expectation and his command. A prominent Bible teacher and author wrote that when we do not pray, we sin. Ouch! That seems like a rather harsh judgment to make about a failure on our part to do what God asks.

But isn’t that what sin is: missing the mark and falling short of what God expects of us?

Knowing that not praying is hurting our relationship with God can even make it harder for us to pray. Thankfully, the Lord knows what we are thinking and feeling about our reluctance or failure to pray consistently for all things!

When we start piling up the reasons why we do not pray and how we have disappointed God, we can do a quick review of God’s attributes to remind ourselves of who God is. Remember, he is omniscient, all-loving, and all-forgiving. When we place our faith in Christ for forgiveness of our sins, he forgives us of all our sin and gives us the gift of eternity with him.

God is just waiting for us to start a conversation with him. Why not start now?

Jane Hall, NCF National Director

Vigilance In the Trenches

June 2, 2015
WW I trenches

Studying French“. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The comradery of our Christian brothers and sisters is an important aspect of standing firm against Satan. We are reminded of this truth in the teaching of both Jesus and Peter (Luke 22:31-34 and 1 Peter 5:8).

When we are feeling discouraged by the attacks of Satan, or our faith is being tested, we know our brothers and sisters around the world are also “in the trenches.”

Are you familiar with the expression or metaphor “in the trenches?” It is a reference from World War I when front-line soldiers lived and fought daily in deep ditches or trenches. They were dirty and bloody, malnourished, wounded and sick, yet their bravery and determination helped them overcome the enemy.

This same reference can be applied to Christians around the world fighting against Satan in God’s holy war. “For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms” (Ephesians 6:12).

All of us are in the trenches resisting Satan and staying faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ. The next time you feel like you are spiritually bruised and tattered, hold fast. You are not alone. For across the border, beyond the continent, and around the globe, millions of our brothers and sisters are fighting the same war.

We are in the trenches together standing firm in victory.

But how can we stand firm in the trenches of spiritual warfare? Spiritually, we must practice focused vigilance, similar to when we are observing a patient who is very sick. We watch their vitals for changes while monitoring their signs and symptoms. Attentively we use our nursing knowledge and assessment skills to watch for complications. We are taking notes and ready to respond if our patient becomes critical.

The same attentiveness is needed to guard ourselves against the lures of Satan. Like Jesus Christ in Matthew 4:1-11, we will be enticed by Satan to sin. We must trust the Lord to strengthen and guide us.

The Lord not only helps us during temptations, he seeks to develop our faith through the process by teaching us faith lessons and increasing our love for God. I have found this prayer helpful from 2 Thessal​onians 3:3, 5:

“But the Lord is faithful, and he will strengthen you and protect you from the evil one. May the Lord direct your hearts into God’s love and Christ’s perseverance.”

Let’s stay actively vigilant and ready to respond to Satan’s temptations.

We are not alone!

NCFI CARES

Carrie Dameron, MSN, RNBC, who is a regular contributor for Nurses Christian Fellowship International and Journal of Christian Nursing. She provides resources for Christian nursing on her blog http://blog.carriedameron.com/.